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Please note that the listings here are only for obituaries that have been found to date. It does not include all those that are listed with readable inscriptions; therefore, we have not yet
cross-referenced them to the tombstone pages. 
Please use the search feature to locate those listed in both directories.


Obituaries

1833
 

Name
Obituary Date
Death Date
Age
6/4/1833
6/3/1833
age 3
Amore, Taffee (free colored man)
2/1/1833
1/29/1833
 
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
76
5/30/1833
5/29/1833
 
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
7
Becky, a slave belonging to William S. Cabell
6/3/1833
5/28/1833
aged 42
black boy, slave of Mrs. Reed
6/3/1833
6/2/1833
1 year old
6/11/1833
6/10/1833
 
7/6/1833
 
 
7/29/1833
 
 
12/2/1833
12/1/1833
aged two years, five months and five days
7/31/1833
 
infant son
child of Mrs. Lane
6/3/1833
6/2/1833
3 years old
4/1/1833
3/27/1833
in the 4th year of his age
1/22/1833 - 1/28/1833
 
 
12/6/1833
12/6/1833
infant son
6/18/1833
6/17/1833
age 1 year
6/3/1833
6/2/1833
23
6/3/1833
5/29/1833
60
9/12/1833
9/11/1833
in her 17th year
1/9/1833
 
 
4/6/1833
 
 
8/24/1833
 
 
Diffey, Robert , negro child slave of Joseph Woods
6/3/1833
5/31/1833
2
8/27/1833
8/23/1833
aged 57 years
6/4/1833
5/28/1833
 
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
12
Ellen, slave of Mr. Megowan
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
 
9/13/1833
9/12/1833
aged five years and nine months
3/14/1833
3/7/1833
infant son
1/22/1833
1/20/1833
 
George, slave of Mrs. Marr
6/3/1833
5/29/1883
12
George, slave of Mrs. Pryor
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
 
2/5/1833
 
aged three years
2/5/1833
 
aged six years
1/17/1833
1/16/1833
 
Harriet, slave of B. S. Weller
6/3/1833
5/29/1833
12
Henny, slave of Mr. Anthony
6/3/1833
6/2/1833
36
6/5/1833
6/4/1833
age 11
11/15/1833
11/4/1833
 
6/3/1833
5/29/1833
37
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
 
8/22/1833
Monday morning last
in the 47th year of his age
8/14/1833-8/22/1833
8/13/1833
aged 42 years and 6 months
12/14/1833 - 12/16/1833
12/13/1833
in the ninth year of her age
12/16/1833
11/2/1833
in the fourth year of her age
5/20/1833
Friday morning last
 
2//2/1833
2/1/1833
 
6/11/1833
 
aged eight months
Jenny, slave of Jesse Collins
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
45
1/23/1833
1/23/1833
 
1/26/1833
1/26/1833
 
Letitia, slave of Dr. 
6/3/1833
5/31/1833
 
Lewis - slave belonging to Alex M'Donald
1/18/1833
 
aged 62
Lindsley, slave of James A. Porter
6/3/1833
5/31/1833
25
6/19/1833-6/21/1833
 
 
3/18/1833
 
 
6/6/1833
 
aged twelve months
1/22/1833
1/21/1833
aged 24 years
6/17/1833
 
infant, aged one year
10/1/1833
 
 
Mingo, slave of Moses Wright
6/3/1833
6/3/1833
33
12/19/1833
12/18/1833
aged one year, eight months
8/26/1833
 
 
2/4/1833
2/4/1833
 
11/15/1833
11/14/1833
 
11/5/1833
10/26/1833
 
11/5/1833
11/4/1833
in the 8th year of his age
Moses, slave of the corporation
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
 
6/24/1833
6/21/1833
 
1/22/1833
1/18/1833
 
6/27/1833
6/24/1833
aged 21 months
4/26/1833
4/12/1833
 
6/1/1833 - 6/3/1833
6/1/1833
61
6/3/1833
6/3/1833
29
4/12/1833
4/12/1833
 
2/22/1833
2/4/1833
age 78
6/11/1833
 
age 54
11/8/1833
11/7/1833
aged twenty years, one months and twenty-two days
10/11/1833
10/10/1833
aged sixty-six years
4/24/1833
 
 
6/3/1833-6/4/1833
6/3/1833
 
1/14/1833
 
 
2/28/1833
 
 
1/19/1833
 
 
5/2/1833 - 5/3/1833
5/2/1833
 
5/10/1833
5/8/1833
aged 24 years
12/3/1833
 
 
6/3/1833
5/29/1833
aged 19
8/31/1833
8/22/1833
aged four years, eleven months, and fifteen days
6/10/1833
6/8/1833
aged three years
1/15/1833
 
 
3/4/1833
2/25/1833
youngest daughter
6/15/1833
6/11/1833
in the 24th year of her age
6/3/1833
6/1/1833
64
6/4/1833
6/3/1833
age 3
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
22
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
53
Taylor, Thornton (colored freeman)
2/2/1833
 
 
4/24/1833
 
 
1/14/1833
 
 
Tom, slave of Dr. Wells
6/3/1833
6/3/1833
 
Toney, slave of Mrs. Porter
6/3/1833
5/30/1833
35
1/17/1833
1/16/1833
aged 55 years
7/8/1833
 
infant daughter
2/26/1833
2/25/1833
 
7/24/1833-8/9/1833
7/23/1833
 
1/22/1833 - 1/28/1833
 
 
5/30/1833
 
 
8/7/1833-8/9/1833
 
 
11/6/1833
11/4/1833
aged 72 years
11/7/1833
on Sunday last
 
2/4/1833
Saturday, 3 o'clock
 
6/17/1833
 
 

Deaths for 1833 from the National Banner and Nashville Daily Advertiser

January 9, 1833
Died in this town, Mrs. Charity Dennis. Funeral this day at half past 1 p. m. from the residence of Mrs. A. Goodwin.

January 14, 1833
Died in this town, Mr. Charles B. Pryor, Esquire.

January 14,1833
Died Miss Arabella Olivia Tilford, daughter of Mr. James Tilford.

January 17, 1833
Died in this town on Wednesday, 16th instant, Mr. Bernard Vanleer, aged 55 years, an enterprising and respectable citizen.

January 12, 1833
Cholera: Mr. and Mrs. Nanny, at the Brick Yard, one mile from town. Mr. Nanny died of relapse of cholera on the evening of the 18th. Mrs. Nanny is convalescent.

January 15, 1833
Mr. Stone, carpenter, of temperate habits died in six hours of cholera.

January 17, 1833
Willie Hanks, College street, died at 8 o’clock on the 16th of cholera.

January 19, 1833
Mrs. Roberts died on the 18th of cholera.

January 22, 1833
Berry McCormac, Spruce street, who was attack on the 18th, relapsed and died last night at half past 10 of cholera, aged 24 years.

January 22, 1833
Died in this town, Mr. Samuel L.Wharton. Miss Margaret Clark.

January 22, 1833
Died on the 20th instant, Mr. Thomas Finn (see copy)

January 23, 1833
William Kirkman died on Whites Creek from cholera on January 23.

January 26, 1833
Mrs. Nancy Lee, on Broad Street, taken yestrday at 6 a. m., not visited until 10 when she collapsed and died at 4 p. m. of cholera.

January 28, 1833
Lewis, a slave belonging to Alex M’Donald, aged 62, attacked January 26, died.

January 28, 1833
Obituary. Samuel L.Wharton (see copy)

February 1, 1833
Taffee Amore, free colored man died on 29th of cholera after 13 hour sickness.

February 2, 1833
Died in Nashville on Friday, 1st February, Mr. John R. Jackson, printer, of cholera.

February 2, 1833
Thornton Taylor, colored free man, Broad Street, died at 4 p. m. of cholera.

February 4, 1833
Mills Witt, taken Friday night, died Saturday 3 o’clock p.m. of cholera.

February 4, 1833
James Moore, town watchman, College Hill, visited Sunday at 8 o’clock, a. m., died this morning 8 o’clock a. m. of cholera.

February 5, 1833
Died James, aged six years and Eleanora Adeline, three years, children of James and Charlotte Gizzard. (See copy)

February 22, 1833
Died in Davidson County on the 4th February, instant, Mrs. Mary Parker, age 78.

February 26, 1833
Died in this town of cholera on the 25th instant, Mr. Thomas Welch. The sudden death of this worthy man is a serious loss to our community. He was amiable, industrious, enterprising and upright, faithful in all the relations of life and universally esteemed, respected and beloved.

February 28, 1833
Died Dr. James Roane (see copy)

March 4, 1833
Died in this county on the 25th ult., Mary L., youngest daughter of Colonel John Stump.

March 14, 1833
Died in this county on Thursday the 7th instant, William J., infant son of Mr. William B. Ewing.

March 18, 1833
Died in this town, Eliza Jane, daughter of Mr. Joseph H. Marshall.

April 1, 1833
Died in this town on the 27th ult. in the 4th year of his age, John Childress, only child of George C. Childress.

April 6, 1833
Died in this town, Mr. William Deshazo (see copy)

April 13, 1833
Died in this county on the 12th instant, Honorable John Overton, formerly one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of this state and an old and highly respected citizen.

April 24, 1833
Died in this county, Mr. Jason Thompson.

April 24, 1833
Died Alexander Porter (see copy)

April 26, 1833
Died in this county on the 12th instant at the house of her father, John Davis, Esquire, Mrs. Eliza Newson, of a painful pulmonary disease which she bore with fortitude and resignation.

May 2, 1833
Died the first of May, Mr. Duncan Robertson (see copy)

May 3, 1833
The Late Duncan Robertson (see copy)

May 10, 1833
Died in this town on Wednesday night, 8th instant, Mr. William Robinson, aged 24. The sudden death of this excellent and much esteemed young man has made a deep impression upon our commerical community and will be long and severely felt. Though unobtrusive in his manners and humble and retired in his sphere of life, he had, during his short residence among us, displayed a character so entirely estimable and qualities of the mind and heart so well calculated to render him useful and beloved, that his unexpected call from the hopes and duties and enjoyments of the world is a source of extensive and unaffected sorrow. To his employers, in the mercantile counting house, he was faithful, competent and valued assistant; to his young associates, he was an amiable, intelligent and agreeable friend; to society he was a public spirited, active, judicious and ardent citizen. In all walks of life which his age and situation enabled him to enter, he was prominent, efficient and useful.

Mr. Robinson was a native of England and has resided in Nashville only about three years. In that short time, he had acquired a standing in the estimation of those who knew him, surpassed perhaps by that of no young man in the community. His habit were industrious, his morals strictly pure and upright, his principles sound, his acquirements highly respectable, his qualifications for business eminent, his disposition amiable, his affections ardent, his generosity and public spirit warm and active and his mental powers above the ordinary level. To him have we and our readers been indebted for many favors as an occasional correspondent. It was he who first suggested the idea of erecting, at the public expense, a suitable memento of the late lamented Duncan Robertson and one of the last acts of his life was the preparation of a subscription paper for the purpose of carrying into effect that judicious and well-times suggestion. Little did we expect, when we received from his prompt and valued pen the first communication which we published on that subject, that our columns would so soon contain the obituary record of its then healthy, young and vigorous author. Little did he expect when he thus tendered the tribute of a kindred spirit to the memory of departed excellence, that he would so soon sleep in silence and inactivity by its side.

May 20, 1833
Died at Paducah, mouth of Tennessee, on Friday morning last, Captain James Irwin of this town, a man of high moral, worth, untiring industry and most amiable disposition. He has long been a citizen of Nashville and no man among us has been more universally exteemed. He has left a large and interesting fmily, deeply to bewail his loss. Mr. Irwin has been for some years past extensively known as the commander of a steam boat on our river and has been eminently distinguished for the equanimity of his temper, the urbanity of his department and his great anxiety to accomodate and give satisfaction.

May 30, 1833
Died in this town, Mrs. Elizabeth Wharton, wife of Jesse Wharton, Esquire of this county. Funeral this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the residence of Dr. Smith, corner of Cherry and Spring streets.

May 30, 1833
Died of cholera on the 29th of May, Mrs. Susannah W. Armstrong, late of East Tennessee, the venerable mother of Colonel Robert Armstrong, Postmaster and Captain William Armstrong, Mayor of this city. She had but recently arrived in Nashville on a visit to her sons and was in the enjoyment of her usual health the evening before her death.

June 1, 1833
Died in this town, Josiah Nichol (see copy - also copy)

June 3, 1833
Died in this town, Francis Porterfield, Esquire (see copy - also copy)

June 3, 1833
The Cholera (see copy)

June 4, 1833
Died of cholera, Charles Cutler (see copy)

June 4, 1833
Deaths in Nashville of cholera on June 3. Louisa Tate, age 3; Francis Porterfield; Martha Aiken, age 3, Mr. Ross Dougal, died May 28.

June 5, 1833
Death by Cholera on Tuesday, June 4, James B. Hogg, age 11, son of Dr. Samuel Hogg.

June 6, 1833
Died in this place, Sarah McCain, aged twelve months, of inflammation of the brain.

June 10, 1833
Died from cholera on June 8, Elizabeth Stevenson, aged three years.

June 11, 1833
Died in this town on Monday, June 10, Mrs. Eliza M. Bradford, consort of Mr. Simon Bradford. Funeral this afternoon at 3 o'clock from her late residence on High Street. Divine service by Rev. Dr. Lindsley.

June 11, 1833
Deaths from cholera, Isham Perdue, age 54; Maria Frances James, age eight months.

June 15, 1833
Died in Davidson County on the 11th instant, Mrs. Lavinia Sumner, wife of Isaac W. Sumner, in the 24th year of her age, leaving an infant son and a numerous circle of relatives and friends to lament her loss.

June 17, 1833
Died in Nashville from cholera, James McKinly, infant, aged one year.

June 17, 1833
Death of Thomas Yeatman (see copy)

June 18, 1833
Died in this town on Monday 17th June, Mary Ann Crooks, infant daughter of John Crooks, age
1 year.

June 19, 1833
Died in this county, Mrs. Frances Love, consort of Colonel Charles I. Love.

June 21, 1833
Died near Nashville, Mrs. Frances Love (see copy)

June 24, 1833
Died in this town on the 21st instant, Captain Howell Myrick of Hardeman County.

June 27, 1933
Died in this town on Friday, June 24, after 16 hours of illness, Mary Elizabeth, infant daughter of Caroline and Richard P. Neil, aged 21 months. "I shall go to her but she shall not return to me." 2 Samuel 12:23

July 6, 1833
Died at Smithland, Kentucky, Mr. Benjamin Brooks (see copy)

July 8, 1833
Died in this town yesterday, Alice, infant daughter of Mr. James Walker.

July 24, 1833
Tuesday, July 23. The Court convened this morning and it was announced that Jesse Wharton, Esquire, late a member of this Court, had departed this life, whereupon on motion of Andrew Hays, Esquire, the following preamble and resolutions were adopted, viz:

Whereas it has been announced to this Court that Jesse Wharton, Esquire, one of the oldest and most valuable members of this community, departed this life about half past 10 o'clock on yesterday evening and whereas the deceased came to this country at an early day and discharged the various public duties assigned him by the confidence of his fellow citizens, with credit to himself and honor to this country, was for many years an honest and enlightened member of this bar, was long a member of the State Legislature, a Representative and Senator in Congress and a member of the Quorum Court from its first organization until with a few months past when he was compelled by declining health to retire, and whereas no man was more extensively known to the people of this state, no man ever lived more respected, none can die more lamented. Therefore: Resolved, That this Court have heard, with the most profound regret, of the death of their late associate and inestimable fellow-citizen, Jesse Wharton, Esquire. That in respect for his private worth and public character, this Court and the members of the bar will wear crape on the left arm for thirty days and adjourn Court until tomorrow morning 9 o'clock.

July 29, 1833
Died in Davidson County, Mrs. Sarah L. Buchanan (see copy)

July 31, 1833
Died in this town, Frances Gregory, infant son of Mr. Callaghan.

August 7, 1833
Died in this county, General William White, an early settler and a highly respected citizen.

August 9, 1833
From the Revivalist: "Death cannot make our souls afraid, If God be with us there." Died at his residence in this county after a long and painful illness which he bore with Christian fortitude, Mr. Jesse Wharton. Thus death, in the short flight of eight weeks, has torn from the stage of mortal life, the loving wife and affectionate husband to slumber in the cold and silent tomb, ever forgetful of all the cares of tumuituous life and weeping friends.

Mr. Wharton was one of the earliest settlers here. As a lawyer at the Nashville bar, he soon distinguished himself for his talent. But his aspiring genius rested not here. It led him on to the Congress of the United States which office he discharged with an ossiduity and merit that do honor to his successors. He was called to be one of the members in the late convention from which he has but a short time since returned with the satisfaction of his government. Having discharged these high responsibilities to which he was called by his country with diligence and assiduous industry, he now returned to enjoy, in the calm retreat of retirement, the tranquil rays of his evening sun and adieu to all the cares of political life and the toil of gain.

Arriving at home, it was not long that he enjoyed unmolested those sweets of rural life and domestic enjoyment. The tender wife of his bosom, that hitherto bore all the delights of life's short day, was called to leave the arms of his affection to the unembittered joys of Heaven. Laboring under the emaciating influence of a diarrhia and the appalling sorrows of a lost and affectionate wife, he was soon hurried from this world beyond all his woes and grief. Affable, benevolent and with a haley on peace within, he has set an example that we may admire but never excel. As a friend, he was warm and sincere, a husband, ardent and loving, a father, kind and affectionate, and a master, indulgent, humane and generous.

Before he left this little scene of things, he felt the all consoling influence of a holy resignation to the divine will of heaven, a reliance in his Saviours's name and a readiness to break forth in the language of good old Simeon, "Lord, now lettest then they servant depart in peace for mine eyes have seen thy salvation." A short time before his spirit had raised its whitened wings to leave the shores of time, he remarked that death to him had lost all its terror. In his life we see all that is examplary, in his public walk, patriotism, dignity and attachment to his country and in his death, truth, illustrious truth, smiling in all the charms of virtue, religion and fortitude.

August 9, 1833
From the Nashville Republican: General William White. In recording the death of the individual whose name stands at the head of these hasty remarks and who was buried at his residence near this place yesterday evening, we are adding another to the long and melancholy list of distinguished and useful citizens that have been swept from this immediate community within the last six or eight months.

How truly has it been said that"in the midst of life we are in death." But for a few short days ago, the subject of this brief obituary notice was in the enjoyment of a most promising health, participating in the concerns of life, surrounded by a numerous and happy family and to all appearance as far from the grave as any of the busy crowd in which he was then mingling. Now, alas, his place is among the dead. Society deplores the loss of an inestimable citizen and to an afflicted and bereaved family, the habitation of past joys has become the "house of mourning."

Late on Friday evening last, General White left town for his residence, slightly indisposed. On Saturday, he was waited on by his physician who administered for a bilious attack. On Sunday he was better. On Monday his disorder rapidly and unexpectedly precipitated its force toward the brain. On Tuesday, the symptoms announced his speedy dissolution and at a few minutes before 7 o'clock of that evening, his spirit fled to "that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveller returns."

As sudden as the stroke of death has fallen upon this "shining mark," the destroyer did not find his victim unprepared. Unused to parade or hypocrisy in the common affairs of life, much less so where religious considerations operated upon his mind, the deceased made no great outward show nor ever indulged in puritanical professions. But his personal friends and the pious and venerated Minister of the Church where he constantly worshipped, bear witness to his Christian spirit and religious walk. He was indeed "an Israelite in whom there was no guile."

A native son of Virginia, General White was born amid the sounding and in the hearing of the cannon at the seige of York and a few days before the surrender of the British army. His patriotic father was, at the moment, a soldier in the camp of Washington. He had consequently nearly completed his 52nd year. In early life he removed to this State where he has ever since resided, honored for his integrity, respected for his courage and admired for the chivalry and spirit which has signalized his course through life. He was a solder of the "8th of January, 1815," a day ever memorable in the kalends of American heroism and anecdotes are told of his intrepidity during the defense of New Orleans which show that fear has no lurking place in his bosom. He was ardent, almost to a fault, in his friendship, in his enemies, charitable and forgiving. Few men have lived more generally esteemed, none have died more honored for courage, humanity, candor and magnanimity.

August 14, 1833
Died in this town at two o'clock on the morning of Tuesday, 13th August, instant, William Gibbes Hunt, Esquire, Editor of this paper, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, aged 42 years and 6 months. It cannot be expected of a distressed brother that he should prepare an elaborae obituary of the deceased. Suffice it to say that he has left a disconsolate widow and three infant children, an aged mother and a sister and brother, beside other relations and friends to mourn a loss indeed irreparable. And we shall be justified in adding that this community, of which he has been for many years past an active and prominent member, will long feel and lament his death.

August 22, 1833
With the death of two such men as Thomas Yeatman and William Gibbes Hunt, within so short a time of each other, in the same community, must be regarded as public calamities. However many men of talent Nashville may contain, she must feel severly the lost of two such individuals.

From the Columbia, Tennessee Mercury. It is with feelings of deep regret that we announce the death of William G. Hunt, Esquire, late editor of the Nashville Banner. Nashville has been extremely unfortunate in the loss of many of her most valuable citizens during the present year but the death of none will be more regretted or produce greater sensation throughout the state than that of Mr. Hunt. For several years past, he has acted a prominent part in the political history of the country and has secured a high reputation as an able and indefatigable editor. It will be difficult to secure the talents of an individual who can perform the duties of editor for the Banner with equal ability and none who can render more satisfaction to its readers than did its late editor.

August 22, 1833
Departed this life at his residence in this county on Monday morning last, Major Isaac H. Howlett in the 47th year of his age, a native of Virginia and for the last 26 years a citizen of Davidson County. This adds another to the many melancholy instances recently experienced of the frail tenure by which human life is held. To a bilious fever of only four days duration, he fell a victim. When we see our old friends and acquaintances thus falling all around us, we may truly exclaim, this is a trying season.

Heaven knows, to the writer at least, many of the brightest pleasures of this life are derived from the reminisences connected with the friends and friendships of bygone days. They are the principal stars that still twinkly on memory's sad waste. The greenest spots on life's dreary landscape. But Heaven's laws must be fulfilled.

Major Howlett acted as a public officer for this County twelve or thirteen years. Therefore was well known and it is nothing more than justice to his memory to add that, although much to his own injury, such was the liberality, mildness and humanity observed in the discharge of his duty as to command the love, confidence and respect of perhaps desired than was exhibited by an extensive circle of weeping relations and the large concourse of sympathizing friends and neighbors following through the silent grove to the spot where now his mortal remains rest in the peaceful slumbers of the tomb.

August 24, 1833
Died yesterday in this town, Mr. Thomas Dickson.

August 26, 1833
Died in this town, David Milton Moore, son of Mr. David M. Moore of the Planter's Hotel.

August 27, 1833
Died at his residence in this county on Friday evening, 23rd instant after a protracted illness of nearly six months, Mr. Levin Donelson, aged 57 years.

August 31, 1833
Died in Davidson County, August 22, Alban Weams, son of Dr. E. B. Smith, aged four years, eleven months and fifteen days. He died with the dropsy of the brain occasioned by a fall from a horse twelve months ago.

September 12, 1833
Died in this county on the 11th instant, Darthula D. Davis, daughter of John Davis, Esquire, in her 17th year.

September 13, 1833
Died in this county on the 12th ult., Mary Louisa Ewing, daughter of William B. Ewing, aged five years and nine months.

October 1, 1833
Died, Miss Elizabeth Metele, formerly of New York (see copy)

October 11, 1833
Died in this town on Thursday 10th instant, Mrs. Sarah Pilcher, formerly of Lexington, Kentucky, aged sixty-six years.

November 5, 1833
Died on Saturday 26th ult., Rufus Grant and on Monday, the 4th instant, Samuel St. Clair, both children of Samuel D. Morgan of the city and the latter in the 8th year of his age.

November 6, 1833
Died in this county on the morning of the 4th instant, John Williams, aged 72 years, a native of Virginia. He aided during the Revolutionary War, in achieving our independence. He was for forty years a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was respected by all who knew him. "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."

November 7, 1833
Died, after a protracted indisposition on Sunday last, Miss Martha Williams, eldest daughter of William Williams of this county.

November 8, 1833
Died at his father's residence near this place yesterday evening at 5 o'clock of billious fever, Robert Petway, aged twenty years, one months and twenty-two days.

November 15, 1833
Died in this city on Thursday, 14th instant, Frank Armstrong, son of Samuel D. Morgan.

November 15, 1833
Died on the 4th instant at Jefferson Barracks after a most tracted illness, Captain R. Holmes of the U. S. Dragoons.

December 2, 1833
OBITUARY. Died, in this city on Sunday, the 1st instant, Edmund, infant son of Colonel John R. Burke, aged two years, five months and five days. "And they brought young children to him, that he should touch them; and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. And when Jesus saw it, he was much displeased and said unto them, suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not for of such is the Kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the Kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein. And he took them up in his arms and put his hands upon them and blessed them."

December 3, 1833
Departed this life, Mrs. M. A. Rowe (see copy)

December 6, 1833
Died in this place on the 6th instant, John Thomas, infant son of George W. Coleman.

December 14, 1833
Died, Ann Hynes (see copy)

December 16, 1833
Died in the neighborhood of Nashville on the 2nd November last, Laura Hynes in the fourth year of her age and on the 13th December instant, Ann Hynes in the ninth year of her age, daughters of Colonel Andrew Hynes.

December 19, 1833
Died on last night, 18th instant, Daniel Webster, son of Dr. Boyd M'Nairy, aged one year, eight months. Funeral at 3 o'clock from his residence.

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